Human rights

Just as for all businesses, institutional investors have a responsibility to respect human rights. This responsibility was formalised by the UN and the OECD in 2011, and since then expectations – from employees, beneficiaries, clients, governments and wider society – have only increased. Expectations have been driven not only by growing visibility and urgency around many human rights issues, but also by a better understanding of investors’ role in shaping real-world outcomes, and of their responsibility to do so – across all their investment activities.

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Why and how investors should act on human rights

Just as for all businesses, institutional investors have a responsibility to respect human rights. This responsibility was formalised by the UN and the OECD in 2011, and since then expectations – from employees, beneficiaries, clients, governments and wider society – have only increased.

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Human rights - case studies

The PRI will be affording its work on human rights equal strategic priority to its work on climate change. Therefore, identifying and sharing examples of leading practices around investors challenges, opportunities and responsibilities in relation to human rights will be a significant priority of the programme of work.

Income inequality

Why and how investors can respond to income inequality

Institutional investors are increasingly realising that income inequality – the gap in income and wealth between the very affluent and the rest of society – has become one of the most noteworthy socio-economic issues of our time.